Gaming PC Setups: From Budget to Beast Mode

If you want a computer that fits your particular specifications and budget, you must assemble it yourself. When you create a gaming PC, you have complete control over the components, including the precise brand and model of motherboard, a case with the desired appearance, and even the configuration of RGB (or non-RGB) fans. You might save time by buying one of the best pre-built gaming PCs, but you’ll lose control and wind up spending more money.

By building your own PC from components, you may save hundreds of dollars over the cost of purchasing a full prebuilt gaming machine. For example, nowadays, purchasing a desktop with hardware identical to those in our best $1,000 PC build will cost you $1,439 or more at Best Buy.

child, play, game

It should be noted that our top PC build suggestions are based on our component knowledge, market research, and testing of the essential components in each build, specifically the CPU, GPU, and SSD. However, because we are attempting to target price points and often altering these lists (as prices change), we have not tested all of the parts in each build together, and some of the less performance-centric elements, such as the chassis, motherboard, and power supply, may have gone unreviewed.

We will also propose GPUs rather than specific brands and models of graphics cards. We’d recommend an RTX 4070 Ti and link to a list of available cards rather than, say, the Zotac RTX 4070 Ti. Given the frequent pricing and supply fluctuations in the area, you should acquire any third- or first-party card with the GPU you choose at the best price at the time of writing.

Also, we do not include the cost of an operating system because Windows is available for free or at a low cost. We do not include the cost of peripherals such as the finest gaming monitors, keyboards, or mice. If you’ve never built a computer before, check out our guide on how to construct a PC.

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<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td>

<h4><strong>Model</strong></h4>

</td>

<td>

<h4><strong>ModelPrice (at Pub Time in USD)</strong></h4>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>Intel Core i3-14100F</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$119</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>ASRock B760M-HDV</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$89</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>Intel Arc A380</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$119</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>Silicon Power Value Gaming DDR4 RAM 16GB (8GBx2) 3200MHz</strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$35Ipamorelin

“></strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>Crucial P3 Plus (1TB</strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$69</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>Thermaltake Versa H18</strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$49Epitalon

“></strong></td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</figure>

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<tbody>

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<td>

<h5><b>Thermaltake Toughpower GX2 600W</b></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6 class=”text-3xl font-semibold leading-tight text-gray-700 dark:text-gray-100 sm:text-4xl”>$60</strong></h6>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>N/A, comes with CPU</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6 class=”text-3xl font-semibold leading-tight text-gray-700 dark:text-gray-100 sm:text-4xl”></strong></h6>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>Total</strong></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6 class=”text-3xl font-semibold leading-tight text-gray-700 dark:text-gray-100 sm:text-4xl”>$540</strong></h6>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><b>Healing and Recovery</b></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6><a href=”BPC-157

“>https://omegalongevity.com/bpc-57/”><strong>BPC-157</strong></a></h6>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>Healing and Recovery </strong></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6><a href=”GHK-Cu

“>https://omegalongevity.com/ghk-cu/”><strong>GHK-Cu</strong></a></h6>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5>Growth Hormone</h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6><a href=”Tesamorelin

“>https://omegalongevity.com/tesamorelin/”><strong>Tesamorelin</strong></a></h6>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5>Growth Hormone</h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6><a href=”CJC-1295

“>https://omegalongevity.com/cjc-1295/”>CJC-1295</a></h6>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</figure>

<h6><!– /wp:table –>

For roughly $500, you can create a computer with a standalone graphics card. You won’t have the fastest GPU available, but you will be able to play games at 1080p with reasonable settings. This is a significant improvement over depending on integrated graphics.

We’ll be using Intel’s Arc A380 graphics card in this setup. We didn’t enjoy the card when it first came out, but it’s been available on Newegg for quite some time. Aside from that, it is quicker than AMD’s competitive RX 6400, has more VRAM, and, most crucially, supports complete video encoding/decoding acceleration, including AV1 compatibility in the future.

In our benchmarks at 1080p medium, the card averaged 54.7 fps, although updated drivers may have boosted performance by another 5-10 percent. If you want something a little quicker and have a few bucks to spare, your best choice is this RX 6500 XT card, which costs roughly $139 and can get 65.8 fps in 1080p medium.

For our CPU, we’re opting with Intel’s Core i3-14100F, which costs little over $100 yet gives enough of power for the budget. This CPU features four cores, all of which are performance cores, and a firm boost clock of 4.7 GHz. It includes a chiller in the package, eliminating the need for a third-party one.

We discovered that the 13100F was about comparable to AMD’s Ryzen 5 5600, which costs approximately $30 more.

To operate with our 14100F, we need an Intel 700 series motherboard, and the best deal we’ve found is $89 for the ASRock B760M-HDV. The microATX board uses DDR4 RAM (which is less expensive than DDR5) and supports M.2 PCIe 3.0 or 4.0 SSDs.

Our SSD is the Crucial P3 Plus, a low-cost PCIe 4.0 SSD rated for 5,000 MBps sequential reads and 3,600 MBps sequential writes. When we examined the P3 Plus’s 2TB capacity, we found that it was an excellent bargain but had average performance. That’s because, like many inexpensive drives, it employs QLC NAND and lacks a DRAM cache. If you have a few more bucks, consider the Crucial P5 Plus, which has DRAM cache and TLC NAND.

We received 16GB of DDR4 PC-3200 RAM in a 2x8GB arrangement. The Silicon Power Value RAM we picked isn’t the flashiest, but it’s economical and comes from a respected company. Whatever you do, avoid building or purchasing a gaming PC with less than 16GB of RAM.

Our case is the Thermaltake Versa H18, which includes a tempered glass side panel, which is unusual for a chassis under $50. It also provides plenty of area for additional cooling, with two 120 or 140mm fans (a 280mm radiator) on the front, a 120mm fan in the back, and a 120 or 140mm fan on top.

While there are cheaper power supply, we don’t want to skimp on this vital component, therefore we chose the Thermaltake Toughpower GX2 600W. It’s an 80 Plus Gold-certified PSU from a respectable company. You may save $10 by purchasing a Bronze PSU instead, but you’ll wind up spending more in the long run, because the power supply has to power your entire PC – cutting shortcuts is not encouraged!

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<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td>

<h4><strong>Model</strong></h4>

</td>

<td>

<h4><strong>ModelPrice (at Pub Time in USD)</strong></h4>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>Intel Core i5-14400F</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$209</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>ASRock B760M-HDV</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$89</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>Nvidia RTX 4060</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$299</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>TeamGroup T-Force Zeus DDR4 32GB (2x16GB)</strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$56Ipamorelin

“></strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>Silicon Power UD90 (1TB)</strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$74</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>DeepCool Matrexx 40 3FS</strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$53Epitalon

“></strong></td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</figure>

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<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><b>Thermaltake Smart 700W</b></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6 class=”text-3xl font-semibold leading-tight text-gray-700 dark:text-gray-100 sm:text-4xl”>
$54</strong></h6>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>N/A, comes with CPU</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6 class=”text-3xl font-semibold leading-tight text-gray-700 dark:text-gray-100 sm:text-4xl”></strong></h6>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>Total</strong></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6 class=”text-3xl font-semibold leading-tight text-gray-700 dark:text-gray-100 sm:text-4xl”>$834</strong></h6>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</figure>

<h6><!– /wp:table –>

If you can extend your budget from $500 to $800, you will be able to enter a whole new realm of gaming performance and productivity, capable of serious 1080p gaming (without ray tracing). We’re moving up from the Core i3 to the Core i5-14400F, which has 6 performance cores, 4 efficiency cores, and 16 total threads, as well as a boost frequency of 4.7 GHz.

We haven’t tried the 14400F yet, but it’s the drop-in replacement for the Core i5-13400F, using the same Raptor Lake architecture but slightly better clock speeds. The Core i5-13400 (13400F with integrated graphics) achieved 152 fps on our 1080p test suite, so the 14400F should deliver comparable or slightly higher performance. Just like the 13400, the 14400F. It also includes a capable cooler in the package, so you don’t have to purchase one separately.

We’re pairing this Intel processor with an ASRock B760M-HDV motherboard since it supports 14th Generation CPUs without requiring a BIOS update. It is a DDR4 board, thus we can save money by utilizing DDR4 memory. It also includes two M.2 slots for SSDs, one of which supports PCIe 4.0 drives.

Our graphics card at this pricing bracket is the Nvidia RTX 4060, which costs little under $300. The 4060 performs well at 1080p extreme settings, with an average frame rate of 84.9 fps across our testing. It is slightly above the RTX 2080 and below the Radeon RX 6700 in our GPU benchmarks hierarchy.

The card can also do ray tracing, as it averaged 41.7 fps at 1080p extreme with ray tracing enabled. Forget about playing in 2K with ray tracing; we only got 25.8 fps.

The 1TB Silicon Power UD90 will serve as our storage solution. This low-cost PCIe 4.0 SSD cannot compete with high-end drives such as the Samsung 990 Pro or WD Black SN850X, but it provides excellent value for money, with sequential reads and writes of 4,800 and 4,200 MBps, respectively.

We’re going with 32GB of TeamGroup T-Force Zeus DDR4 RAM and upgrading to a 700W Thermaltake Smart power supply to handle our higher-wattage processor and GPU.

AMD plans to release Strix Point Ryzen processors with Zen 5 and RDNA 3+ architectures in 2024.

AMD plans to launch its following generation of Ryzen CPUs, known as Strix Point, in 2024, which will have Zen 5 CPU and RDNA 3+ GPU designs, as well as XDNA 2 architecture upgrades. The news came during an AI PC symposium in Beijing, when AMD’s Senior Vice President of Engineering for Radeon Technologies Group, David Wang, first discussed the future RDNA 3+ GPU architecture. Though there was some doubt about the nature of RDNA 3+ and its relationship to the upcoming Navi 4x series, AMD CEO Lisa Su stated that RDNA 3+ is an extension of the RDNA 3 design, intended to improve rather than replace the next RDNA 4 GPU architecture.

The Strix Point CPUs will also have support for the sophisticated Zen 5 CPU architecture, which represents a substantial advancement in AMD processor technology. According to AMD’s press comments, the goal of this integration is to improve neural processing unit (NPU) performance beyond the limits of the existing Hawk Point series.

For Up to 1000$ Dollars…

1. HP Omen 45L

CPU: Intel Core i9-13900K | GPU: Nvidia GeForce RTX 4090 (24 GB) | RAM: 16GB DDR5 5,200MHz | Storage: 1TB PCIe NVMe SSD, 1 TB SATA HDD | Weight: 49.82 pounds | Size: 8.03″ x 18.5″ x 21.85″

Pros:

Excellent 4K gaming performance.
Provides enough cooling.

Cons:

Expensive
The HP Omen 45L is a beast of a gaming setup that both new and experienced PC gamers should flock to. It has the newest 13th generation Intel Core i9 CPU for amazing computational power, guaranteeing that this system easily handles anything from daily work to broadcasting and recording gaming. That CPU works flawlessly with the Nvidia RTX 4090 graphics, thus this top PC gaming top is ready to play 4K games at high frame rates with ray tracing enabled. You’ll want to choose one of the top 4K gaming displays for your battle station.

If that isn’t enough to get you to buy the HP Omen 45L, there’s 16GB of fast DDR5 RAM for easy multitasking, a 1TB SSD for quick booting, and a 1TB HDD for storing movies, photographs, and documents. Of course, you don’t want its hot-running, high-power components to overheat, therefore the front of the case has 360mm liquid cooling and three 120mm PC fans. Topping off this PC is a custom tempered glass side panel that displays all of the outstanding internals as well as four RGB lighting zones.

2. iBuyPower TraceMesh Gaming Desktop

CPU: Intel Core i7-13700F | GPU: Nvidia RTX 4060 | RAM: 16GB DDR5 5,200MHz | Storage: 1TB SSD | Weight: 38 pounds | Size: 19.3″ x 8.66″ x 18.9″

Pros:

Ready to run games at 1080p with good frame rates.
Includes mouse and keyboard.

Cons:

Not suitable for 4K gaming.
Get gaming with this low-cost PC that provides some very powerful hardware for less than expected. The iBuyPower TraceMesh Gaming Desktop has a 13th generation Intel Core i7 processor and Nvidia RTX 4060 graphics, giving you enough of computing power to run 1080p games at high frame rates. You might even be able to enjoy 1440p gaming if you eliminate some graphical enhancements.

Those CPUs are teamed with 16GB of high-bandwidth DDR5 RAM, guaranteeing that this PC can run numerous apps at the same time—the TraceMesh Gaming Desktop may even be a feasible option for those interested in game streaming. We can’t forget about the 1TB of SSD storage for quick launches and saves of all those apps, while the casing and fans keep the PC’s hardware operating smoothly. Of course, if you wish to update components in the future, iBuyPower makes that simple. Even an RGB mouse and keyboard are included, allowing you to save money on additional amazing gaming gear.

3. Alienware Aurora R16

Pros:

Extremely powerful CPUs.
Pros: Excellent multitasking abilities.

More mainstream design.
This Alienware Aurora R16 model is packed with considerable technology for individuals looking for the latest and best while also keeping a healthy budget. Rather than the futuristic design of the Aurora R15, Alienware returns to the mainstream with the boxy R16, which nevertheless has lots of RGB lights. This case is intended for maximum airflow and has strong fans and a 240mm liquid CPU cooler that runs quietly. Given the heavy components inside this machine, significant cooling is required.

The system is powered by an Intel Core i9-14900KF CPU and RTX 4080 Super graphics, which are part of Nvidia’s mid-series update. These CPUs have the power to tackle whatever PC games are thrown at them. This system is capable of achieving high framerates at 4K and encoding videos in minutes. It doesn’t end there; the Alienware Aurora R16 has 32GB of DDR5 RAM operating at 5,600 MHz, making it a multitasking powerhouse. Furthermore, the massive 2TB of high-speed NVMe M.2 PCIe SSD storage allows for lightning-fast game loading.

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<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td>

<h4><strong>Model</strong></h4>

</td>

<td>

<h4><strong>ModelPrice (at Pub Time in USD)</strong></h4>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>Intel Core i5-14600KF</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$284</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>Gigabyte Z790 UD AX</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$199</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>Nvidia RTX 4070</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$524</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>Crucial Pro RAM 32GB (2x16GB) DDR5</strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$112Ipamorelin

“></strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>WD Black SN850X (2TB)</strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$164</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>Lian Li Lancool 216</strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$99Epitalon

“></strong></td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</figure>

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<tbody>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><b>Corsair CX750M</b></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6 class=”text-3xl font-semibold leading-tight text-gray-700 dark:text-gray-100 sm:text-4xl”>
$89</strong></h6>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>ID-Cooling FrostFlow 280mm</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6 class=”text-3xl font-semibold leading-tight text-gray-700 dark:text-gray-100 sm:text-4xl”>$59</strong></h6>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>Total</strong></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6 class=”text-3xl font-semibold leading-tight text-gray-700 dark:text-gray-100 sm:text-4xl”>$1,530</strong></h6>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</figure>

<h6><!– /wp:table –>

As we step up to a build that should be brilliant at 1080p gaming, really strong for 1440p gaming and capable of running ray tracing games well, we’re looking at around a $1,500 budget, depending on the current prices on graphics cards. We recommend going with an RTX 4070 at this price point.

At press time, RTX 4070 cards selling for as little as $24. In our GPU benchmarks hierarchy, the 4070 beats the RTX 3080 (10GB) and comes in just a step behind the 3080 (12GB) at non-ray tracing 1080p gaming. On our suite of 8 games, at 1080p ultra settings, the 4070 managed 123.6 fps. At 1440p resolution, it offered a smooth 98.6 fps and, even at 4K, it provided a very-playable 67.2 fps.

With ray tracing enabled, the RTX 4070 can achieve 69.4 fps at 1080 ultra and a playable 45.2 fps at 1440p. In certain titles, the figures are far greater. For example, in Spider-Man: Miles Morales at 1440p, the card achieved an average frame rate of 69 fps.

We’re also updating the CPU to Intel’s Core i5-14600KF, an overclockable processor with six performance cores, eight efficiency cores, twenty threads, and a boost rate of 5.3GHz. That is before you try to overclock it.

We’re going with the Gigabyte Z790 UD AX motherboard, which supports overclocking thanks to its 16+1+1 hybrid phase digital power architecture. It also has three M.2 PCIe slots, built-in Wi-Fi 6E, and 2.5 Gbe Ethernet.

Although Intel 13th Generation CPUs may use either DDR4 or DDR5 RAM, this motherboard uses DDR5 RAM. So we’re going with a cheap 32GB Crucial kit with a maximum speed of 5600 MT/s.

Our case for this design is the $99 Lian Li Lancool 216. When we tested the Lancool 216, we appreciated its twin RGB 160mm front and single 140mm exhaust fans, good cable management, and sleek design. There’s also enough capacity for a top-mounted radiator measuring up to 360mm.

Our power supply is a 750-watt Corsair CX750M. This 80 Plus Gold certified power supply provides enough power to sustain our GPU while leaving enough of juice to spare. However, it is not completely modular, as some of the cables are built-in.

What Gaming PC do you need to run Modern Games?

To run modern games effectively, you’ll need a gaming PC with the following recommended specifications:

  • CPU: Intel Core i5 or i7, or AMD Ryzen 5 or 7 series, with a minimum of 4 cores.
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 1660 or RTX 2060, or AMD RX 5600 or 5700 series.
  • RAM: At least 16GB for optimal performance.
  • Storage: SSD (Solid State Drive) is preferred for faster load times, with at least 512GB of space.
  • Operating System: Windows 10 or later, or a modern version of Linux for gaming compatibility.

These specs should allow you to enjoy most modern games with good performance and graphics settings. However, for the latest AAA titles, higher-end components may be required for the best experience. Always check the specific game’s requirements for the best results. 🎮

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<table>

<tbody>

<tr>

<td>

<h4><strong>Model</strong></h4>

</td>

<td>

<h4><strong>ModelPrice (at Pub Time in USD)</strong></h4>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3d</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$369</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>Gigabyte B650M Aorus Elite AX</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$179</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>Nvidia RTX 4070 Ti Super</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$799</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>G.Skill Trident Z5 RGB Series 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR5 6000</strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$114Ipamorelin

“></strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>WD Black SN850X (2TB)</strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$164</strong></td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>Hyte Y40</strong></h5>

</td>

<td><strong>$142Epitalon

“></strong></td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</figure>

<p><!– /wp:table –>

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<tr>

<td>

<h5><b>Corsair RM750e</b></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6 class=”text-3xl font-semibold leading-tight text-gray-700 dark:text-gray-100 sm:text-4xl”>
$79</strong></h6>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong><strong>ARCTIC Liquid Freezer II 360mm AIO</strong></strong></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6 class=”text-3xl font-semibold leading-tight text-gray-700 dark:text-gray-100 sm:text-4xl”>$124</strong></h6>

</td>

</tr>

<tr>

<td>

<h5><strong>Total</strong></h5>

</td>

<td>

<h6 class=”text-3xl font-semibold leading-tight text-gray-700 dark:text-gray-100 sm:text-4xl”>$1,970</strong></h6>

</td>

</tr>

</tbody>

</table>

</figure>

<h6><!– /wp:table –>

Our high-end gaming PC configuration, which costs $1,970 right now, should give adequate horsepower to play games at 1440p extreme settings with solid frame rates and 4K ultra with playable frame rates. The system’s GPU power comes from an Nvidia RTX 4070 Ti Super, which is presently available for $799. The card is powered by AMD’s Ryzen 7 7800X3D, the greatest CPU for gaming if you can afford the $439 asking price.

In our tests, the RTX 4070 Ti Super achieved a very smooth 102.9 fps on our test suite of games at 2K settings without ray tracing. It even achieved 73.7 fps at 2K with ray tracing enabled.

The AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D provides a greater experience owing to its 104MB 3D cache, 8 cores, 16 threads, and 5-GHz boost clock. Yes, AMD makes the Ryzen 9 7950X3D, which is quicker overall, but it is much more expensive and sometimes ties or falls behind the 7800X3D in gaming testing.

On our Windows 11 tests, running at 1080p with an RTX 4090 card, the 7800X3D averaged 224 fps, slightly ahead of the Ryzen 9 7950X3D (222 fps) and much ahead of Intel’s top-ranked Core i9-13900K (200 fps).

Explore all your creativity with these gaming pc set up ideas, all of these range from 500$ to 1900$, so you can adjust to different budgets.

No matter the country where you are, you can shopping in e-commerce platforms all these components, like Amazon, and compare different stores.

If you want to read more articles like this about gaming computers, don’t forget to subscribe!

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